History

Our most obvious source of data for understanding the mind-culture nexus is the history of human minds in cultures. Several of the Center’s projects are dedicated to understanding the mind-culture nexus in historic moments of dynamic transformation.

Visualizing the Deep Past with 3D Archaeology

Visualizing the Deep Past with 3D Archaeology

Visualizing the Deep Past (VDP) applies leading-edge computer simulation and 3D visualization techniques to demonstrate how human beings can activate understanding of the deep past, thereby reconstructing how human minds developed and how our potential for creativity and cultural transformation was unleashed. Beyond the scope of the use-case application to Çatalhöyük, VDP will also demonstrate one way to handle the problem of human inquiry being stalled by too much data, too many disciplines, and too much complexity in the mind-culture nexus. Visualization methods have shown great promise in giving us expansive control of the rich datasets computers can generate and in keeping human inquiry engaged with the intricacy of the mind-culture nexus. Years active: 2017–Present. In partnership with VMASC.

Key personnel

Publications
Shults, F. LeRon and Wesley J. Wildman, “Modeling Çatalhöyük: Simulating Religious Entanglement and Social Investment in the Neolithic,” in Ian Hodder, ed., Religion, History and Place. Denver: University of Colorado Press, forthcoming.

 
Civilizational Transformation Project

Civilizational Transformation Project

This project attempts to unearth the way minds and cultures undergo parallel and connected processes of change during key eras of transformation in civilizational form. Such eras include the transformation from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to settlements with farmers domesticating crops and animals, the so-called Axial Age in which universal worldviews became widespread, and the period of modernity in which scientific understandings of nature and nation states became widespread.